Environmental Finance

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Picture Credit: Fenner School of Environment and Society

The Environment Finance programme at Re-Define is designed specifically to apply our financial expertise to help improving environmental policy outcomes. Re-Define believes in the necessity for long-term vision and policies that take into account the need for environmental and financial sustainability.

One our latest policy papers, written by Sony Kapoor, examines how globalisation has changed the nature of risks people face. It shows how, while idiosyncratic risks have fallen, the threat of system-wide risks has risen significantly. These developments have been accompanied by an ever-increasing degree of externalities, as well as faster and larger cross-border flows. These consist not only of commerce, but also of people, information technologies and pathogens. While the increase in cross-border flows has generated new opportunities, it has also exposed us to new threats calling for new institutional structures and a new approach to global governance.

We believe that as the most integrated region in the world, the European Union should take a leading role in tackling these emerging challenges and in developing a model for new governance that can be replicated at the global level. Such an approach would be beneficial both for the EU itself and the wider world.

In the second part, the paper outlines specific short-to-medium term measures that Europe must take in order to tackle triple fiscal, financial and environmental crises facing the world. This would allow the EU to take a leading role in global affairs, while also strengthening the Union and aiding further integration.

 

You can download some of our policy notes and reports below.

This new European Parliament policy paper from Re-Define considers how globalization has changed the nature of risks that we are now facing. It shows how, at the same time as idiosyncratic risks have fallen, the threat of system-wide risks has risen significantly. This has been accompanied by an ever increasing degree of externalities as well as faster and larger cross border flows. This involves not just commerce but people, information technologies and pathogens. While the increase in cross border flows has generated new opportunities, it has also exposed us to new threats. This calls for new institutional structures and a new approach to global governance.

The European Union should, as the most integrated region in the world, take the lead in both taking these emergent challenges head on and developing a model for new governance that can be replicated at the global level. This would be beneficial for Europe, and for the world.

In the second part, this paper lays out specific short-to-medium term measures that Europe must take in order to tackle the triple fiscal, financial and climate crises confronting the world. This would not only help Europe emerge stronger and more integrated but would also allow the Union to take the lead in global affairs. About 95% of our writings and publications are tailor made for governments and international institutions and are not public. However we are committed to putting as many of our ideas and policy recommendations in the public domain as possible.

Emergent Global Challenges: What Europe Needs to do to Tackle the Triple Crises of Tax Finance and Climate

The following policy brief, that Re-Define wrote for the Foundation of European Progressive Studies, deals with the issue of funding adaptation and mitigation. This paper begins to not only lay out the foundations of Re-Define's vision of a Green Financial System but also makes some concrete suggestions about how best to find money for Green Investments and for Adaptation in these fiscally stressed times. 

Tackling Climate Change: Tools to Fund Adaptation and Mitigation

This concept note suggests how a Technology Adaptation and Insurance Fund could be set up under the UNFCC to help reach a deal at Copenhagen.

Technology Adaptation and Insurance Fund

This piece compares and contrasts emissions trading programs and carbon taxes in terms of their effectiveness in helping reduce emissions.

Mitigation - Emissions Trading or Carbon Taxes?